Carrot Cake

This used to be my mom’s carrot cake. She sold it by the slice when she worked at The Wimbledon Country Club in Houston, Texas. Then she hired me as a short order cook, but she allowed me to do quite a bit of the baking when the lunch rush was over. I made a few minor changes to improve the cake, but I never told my mom what I did. She would eat a bite and say, “Your cake always tastes better than mine!” (Laughing in my sleeve.) Now I am going to share the “secret”. I added a couple more eggs, beat them really well, doubled the vanilla, and used golden raisins. 

I made this twice in the last few weeks and I can assure you that if you accidentally switch the amounts of baking soda and baking powder, it will sink in the middle but still be edible. It does not really matter if you grate the carrots fine or coarse, but the extra eggs do make a difference. This sounds fussy, but it also makes a difference if you bring your eggs to room temperature before beating (for any cake). I never remember to set them out before I need them, but that is OK. You can place them in a bowl of lukewarm water and they will be room temperature by the time you get your pans ready. 


CARROT CAKE


6 eggs, at room temperature

2 C. sugar

3 C. grated carrots

2 tsp. baking soda

2 C. flour

1 1/2 tsp. baking powder

1 tsp. salt

1 tsp. cinnamon

1 1/4 C. oil

1 Tbs. vanilla

1 C.  golden raisins, rolled in a little flour


Beat eggs and sugar very well. It should look like this.


 


 Roll the raisins in a bit of flour in one of your cake pans. Why get a separate pan dirty? Coating them in flour helps keep them all from clumping together and sinking to the bottom of the pans. 




Stir remaining ingredients into egg and sugar mixture. Fold in raisins. Pour into 3 round 9 inch cake pans that have been lined with waxed paper and greased and floured. To line with waxed paper, simply layer three sheets of waxed paper, each big enough to cover the bottom of the cake pan, set the pan on top and trace the edge of the pan with the point of the scissors. Cut all three at the same time, slightly smaller than the line you traced. Lay one in each pan, then grease and flour. 




Bake at 350° for approximately 30 min. Cake should begin to pull away from the sides of the pan, but sometimes it doesn’t. If you poke a toothpick into the center, it should come out dry. In the picture below, one cake pulled away from the edges and one didn’t. Both tested done with the toothpick. 



Cool on rack in pans for 10 min. Run a butter knife around the edges of the pans, to make sure it is loosened. Then invert pans onto rack and carefully peel off the waxed paper while it is still warm. If you wait until the cake cools completely, you risk cake sticking to the waxed paper when you peel it off. 




CREAM CHEESE FROSTING


16-oz. (4 cups) powdered sugar

16-oz. softened cream cheese

1 C. softened butter

2 tsp. vanilla

2 C. chopped pecans


Beat until fluffy. Frost cake and garnish with pecan halves, if desired. Save the last piece for me. 

Same cake, decorated a different way. Instead of nuts on the sides and swirls on top, I mixed the nuts into the icing. Makes a better presentation in the picture at the top, but this tastes just as good if you are in a hurry.


© Being Fruitful, 2012